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Autofluorescence of Prymnesium parvum cell. The two big red organelles are chloroplasts, and one of the two flagella is fluorescent green. No one is sure why only one flagellum is green in P. parvum.

This page is about my research, which spans several labs, approaches, and types of organism.

I am interested in evolution and ecology, experiments and theory, microbes and macrobes. I graduated from the University of Arizona’s Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, followed by a postdoc with Régis Ferrière in collaboration with Chris Bowler and others at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France.

I have recently developed a new approach to increasing the ecological stability of large-scale microalgal culturing for biofuels (and other) applications. You can read about that here.

I began a postdoc with Mike Travisano at the University of Minnesota in the summer of 2014, and am enjoying life in the Twin Cities thus far. (Note: I am writing this in July.)

Feel free to contact me (w w driscoll “at” gmail “dot” com, minus the spaces) with questions, comments, constructive criticism, or vitriol.

My work with Prymnesium parvum with Jeremiah Hackett recently got a little bit of coverage from Science Daily and National Geographic’s Weird & Wild blog.